Dashiel Neimark

Dashiel Neimark

Dashiel Neimark - UX Architect

Craigslist’s Unconventional User Experience

Why does Craigslist, a Web site that looks like a tribute to the Web of the ’90s, remain popular in a world that increasingly values well-crafted, beautiful user experiences? My multifaceted answer to this question is that Craigslist leverages several concepts that aren’t generally factors in mainstream product design. These factors include relatable flaws, the freedom to think hard, goal-driven visual nonchalance, effort justification, and social-penetration theory. I’ll discuss each of these in turn.

Check out the rest of this topic over at my UXmatters column.

 

Second-hand UX: The Social Implications of Tangible Tech

“The experience of the target user is not isolated from the experience of the indirect user. Whether it happens immediately or eventually, the two experiences affect and influence each other.

The target user, as entranced as they may be by their own experience, will continually receive feedback from others who were witness to this experience and will begin to judge the primary experience not only from their own frame of view but also from feedback received from constituents of their social ecosystem. The final verdict on an experience is often a group effort.”

When will user research and design start to focus on indirect users? Check out my new article, Second-hand UX: The Social Implications of Tangible Tech, on Boxes and Arrows.

 

The War on Information

Information: A substance that once was a battle to obtain and is now more available than oxygen. The changes that have taken place within the knowledge era that we now live in has shifted the power from information distributors to information recipients.

What does this mean for Information Architects and other UX practitioners?

Check out my Boxes and Arrows article, The War on Information.

Death by Micro: Feedback Loops and Knowledge Management in User Experience

“A common theme in my experience as a UX Designer is that measuring an interaction or a particular experience in a vacuum can be misleading. Even if you measure an experience using the proper methods, the perfect sample size, and all the right tools, you still might find that you’ve done yourself and your product a huge disservice. The world is chaotic and, when we make the mistake of sinking down into the abyss of overly minute investigations into micro interactions, we lose sight of how the way users got there and where they’re going next affects the overall experience. We lose the context. In the knowledge era, this type of knowledge management has become vital to organizations.”

Check out my new UXmatters article, Death by Micro: Feedback Loops and Knowledge Management in User Experience, to read more about my thoughts on being overly micro and how that affects feedback loops and knowledge management in UX.