Dashiel Neimark

Dashiel Neimark

Dashiel Neimark - UX Architect

Persuasive Product Companies and Empathy Reversal

“Good design patterns require a foundation of thorough user research, usability testing, and iterative design refinements. Fortunately, other companies—particularly early promoters of particular design patterns—have sometimes laid the groundwork for us. Depending on the perceived level of risk in implementing a new design pattern, it could be advantageous to simply sit back and see what happens when the developer of a competitive product tries something new. The efficacy of waiting and following, however, is highly dependent on the number of competitors within a product space and how much influence they have over society.”

Read more over at my UXmatters column.

Visceral Response to Dishonesty in Experience Design

“You manifest your own reality.” You’ve probably heard some version of this message before. It’s almost become a cliché. But what does it really mean? Can you literally create your own reality? Well, no. You can’t simply change the physical world in which you live at the snap of your fingers. But what you can change is your mental state—and that just might impact the world around you over time. For example, people’s interactions with digital products influence their mental state. So, as more and more customer experiences become digital experiences, UX designers have the opportunity to design experiences that can be a catalyst for emotionally positive chain reactions among customers.

Check out the full column over at UXmatters

Craigslist’s Unconventional User Experience

Why does Craigslist, a Web site that looks like a tribute to the Web of the ’90s, remain popular in a world that increasingly values well-crafted, beautiful user experiences? My multifaceted answer to this question is that Craigslist leverages several concepts that aren’t generally factors in mainstream product design. These factors include relatable flaws, the freedom to think hard, goal-driven visual nonchalance, effort justification, and social-penetration theory. I’ll discuss each of these in turn.

Check out the rest of this topic over at my UXmatters column.

 

Second-hand UX: The Social Implications of Tangible Tech

“The experience of the target user is not isolated from the experience of the indirect user. Whether it happens immediately or eventually, the two experiences affect and influence each other.

The target user, as entranced as they may be by their own experience, will continually receive feedback from others who were witness to this experience and will begin to judge the primary experience not only from their own frame of view but also from feedback received from constituents of their social ecosystem. The final verdict on an experience is often a group effort.”

When will user research and design start to focus on indirect users? Check out my new article, Second-hand UX: The Social Implications of Tangible Tech, on Boxes and Arrows.

 

Constraint-Driven Innovation : The Creative Value of Knowing your Limits

Is the unfettered mind all that it’s cracked up to be?

“So, in a rather ironic fashion, I’ve broken free of traditional thought by thinking inside the box. My advice to you guys is to not be afraid to stand in opposition to everyone’s natural inclination to “be free” and “shoot for the sky” when engaging in creative thought. Sometimes having your head in the clouds while discussing a wireframe or designing a user research study isn’t as effective as it is catchy – such conversations might benefit from taking place here on Earth, where these things actually exist. There’s a lot of inspiration to be gained in the process of more passionately engaging your limits. Design solutions are best manifested when there is an appreciation for the balance between creativity and possibility.”

Check out my new UXMag article, Constraint-Driven Innovation : The Creative Value of Knowing your Limits.

The War on Information

Information: A substance that once was a battle to obtain and is now more available than oxygen. The changes that have taken place within the knowledge era that we now live in has shifted the power from information distributors to information recipients.

What does this mean for Information Architects and other UX practitioners?

Check out my Boxes and Arrows article, The War on Information.

Death by Micro: Feedback Loops and Knowledge Management in User Experience

“A common theme in my experience as a UX Designer is that measuring an interaction or a particular experience in a vacuum can be misleading. Even if you measure an experience using the proper methods, the perfect sample size, and all the right tools, you still might find that you’ve done yourself and your product a huge disservice. The world is chaotic and, when we make the mistake of sinking down into the abyss of overly minute investigations into micro interactions, we lose sight of how the way users got there and where they’re going next affects the overall experience. We lose the context. In the knowledge era, this type of knowledge management has become vital to organizations.”

Check out my new UXmatters article, Death by Micro: Feedback Loops and Knowledge Management in User Experience, to read more about my thoughts on being overly micro and how that affects feedback loops and knowledge management in UX.

Digital Power Structures: The Whispered Secret of UX

Responsive web design offers us a way forward, finally allowing us to design for the ebb and flow of things. There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly.

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